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According to alcoholrehabguide.org

Risk Factors for Alcoholism in the Elderly

Alcoholism can affect a person of any age, ethnicity, faith or background. However, certain factors like chronic drinking, gender and medical history can increase the risk of senior alcohol use.

Chronic drinkers – those who habitually consume an excessive amount of alcohol – make up a large number of seniors who struggle with alcoholism. In fact, roughly two-thirds of older adults who have a drinking problem are chronic drinkers. Chronic drinking can sometimes start in early adulthood and persist throughout an individual’s golden years. Other times, a person may achieve sobriety, but relapse down the road.

As individuals enter their senior years, women are more likely than men to develop dangerous drinking habits. A number of studies are being conducted to determine the cause of this shift in recent trends.

Frequent drinking greatly increases a woman’s risk of developing health complications such as high blood pressure, cardiovascular problems and liver disease. Additionally, a growing number of women are experimenting with binge drinking. This involves consuming four or more alcoholic beverages in a two-hour time period. Between 2005 and 2006 alone, binging among senior women rose 44 percent.

Chronic health conditions, which are long-term diseases that worsen over time, can also increase the risk for elderly alcohol dependence. Recent studies suggest that seniors suffering from multiple chronic conditions are roughly five times more likely to have a drinking problem. The most common chronic conditions among seniors include type 2 diabetes, heart disease, obesity and cancer.
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According to alcoholrehabguide.org

Risk Factors for Alcoholism in the Elderly

Alcoholism can affect a person of any age, ethnicity, faith or background. However, certain factors like chronic drinking, gender and medical history can increase the risk of senior alcohol use.

Chronic drinkers – those who habitually consume an excessive amount of alcohol – make up a large number of seniors who struggle with alcoholism. In fact, roughly two-thirds of older adults who have a drinking problem are chronic drinkers. Chronic drinking can sometimes start in early adulthood and persist throughout an individual’s golden years. Other times, a person may achieve sobriety, but relapse down the road.

As individuals enter their senior years, women are more likely than men to develop dangerous drinking habits. A number of studies are being conducted to determine the cause of this shift in recent trends.

Frequent drinking greatly increases a woman’s risk of developing health complications such as high blood pressure, cardiovascular problems and liver disease. Additionally, a growing number of women are experimenting with binge drinking. This involves consuming four or more alcoholic beverages in a two-hour time period. Between 2005 and 2006 alone, binging among senior women rose 44 percent.

Chronic health conditions, which are long-term diseases that worsen over time, can also increase the risk for elderly alcohol dependence. Recent studies suggest that seniors suffering from multiple chronic conditions are roughly five times more likely to have a drinking problem. The most common chronic conditions among seniors include type 2 diabetes, heart disease, obesity and cancer.

Does someone you know have a problem with drinking? ... See MoreSee Less

Does someone you know have a problem with drinking?

1 week ago

AlabamaTombigbee Area Agency on Aging

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Celebrating National Social Work Month by highlighting the important contributions social workers make to society. Our licensed social workers help address challenging issues and forge solutions to help clients live their best lives. #SocialWorkMonth ... See MoreSee Less

Celebrating National Social Work Month by highlighting the important contributions social workers make to society.  Our licensed social workers help address challenging issues and forge solutions to help clients live their best lives. #SocialWorkMonth

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Thank you Brooke. Love you Sweet Girl. ❤️❤️❤️

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